LEED New Construction & Major Renovations

LEED New Construction & Major Renovations

LEED is an internationally recognized green building rating tool.
It provides building owners and operators with a framework for identifying and implementing practical and measurable green building design, construction, operations and maintenance solutions.

LEED for New Construction is applied to many building types including offices, libraries, churches, hotels and government buildings.

LEED for New Construction addresses design and construction activities for both new buildings and major renovations of existing buildings, which includes major HVAC improvements, significant envelope modifications, and major interior rehabilitation.

While primarily focused on design and construction, LEED for New Construction also helps lay the foundation for sustainable operations and maintenance practices once the project has been completed. Upfront planning for green operations and maintenance can help building owners and operators ensure that the building performs to its full potential.

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Thursday, 6th March 2014

Neil Tilley, Tata Steel

Tata Steel is currently looking for a building that is to be assessed using LEED v4. We hope to clarify suitable interpretations of certain parts of LEED v4 by working in close and open collaboration with, and support of, the design team. Currently we anticipate approaching LEED Technical Advisory Groups (TAGs) and working with LEED Approved Professional to make credit interpretation requests that will clarify the current version and aid in making future assessment clearer and more streamlined. If you are currently using LEED v4 or intend to do so in the near future and would like to discuss the possibility of working together please contact me.

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Tuesday, 1st October 2013

Darren Jones, Nicholas Hare Architects

Whilst I haven't used it on a project yet, the latest version of LEED - v4 - looks very encouraging. It appears to be much more rigorous, setting some really challenging environmental targets - notably in areas such as indoor air quality - and has a completely overhauled and much more user friendly interface.

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Friday, 19th July 2013

Ben Hopkins, Bennetts Associates

As the previous comments say, BREEAM seems more naturally suited to a European project, particularly in terms of the material specification credits.

The lack of experience in the industry also feels like a barrier to use at the moment, as well as the uncertainty over the workload it puts on the project team compared to BREEAM. This will no doubt change as more people become familiar with it.

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Friday, 22nd March 2013

Darren Jones, Nicholas Hare Architects

Agree with Neil's comments. At the moment BREEAM is probably a better alternative for the UK and Europe, but LEED is catching up and improving with each edition.

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Thursday, 21st March 2013

Neil Tilley, Tata Steel

The LEED building rating system has its roots in USA based construction. It is a very useful tool that is currently going through its 5th public comment draft. Its gain in popularity is to its credit but its use outside of the USA needs to take account of regional and geographic considerations. In Europe there are consideration such as the Construction Product Regulation, European methodologies & standards and EU waste directives that are not fully accounted for within the current edition. A great development would be to have a European version that considers the specific needs of the region, it is hoped that the forthcoming 5th edition might allow appropriate regional characteristics to be considered.

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